KS5

A Level English Language and Literature
Exam Board: Eduqas 

We offer A-level English Language and Literature which allows students to continue to develop their skills in both areas of study and combine their love of Literature with opportunities to develop their own creative writing skills. 

The course provides you with an introduction to advanced studies in English Language and Literature and presents opportunities for reading widely and for making creative and informed responses to poetry, prose, drama and a range of non-literary texts. This A Level will develop and enhance your techniques of analysis, evaluation and comparison of literary and non-literary texts.
To be successful in this course, you will have to have a mature attitude and be willing to spend time reading challenging texts, both in class and in your own time and willingness to discuss and analyse texts, both in a collaborative and independent way.

Course Overview:

Course Content 
The course comprises of four units:
• Component 1 – Poetry and Prose (30%)
• Component 2 - Drama (30%)
• Component 3 – Non-literary texts (20%)
• Component 4 – Critical and Creative Genre Study (20%)

Component 1 – Poetry and Prose
External Examination: 2 hours (120 marks)

This component encourages students to develop their ability to read widely and engage critically with a range of texts whilst developing further students’ techniques of analysis and evaluation. There are two sections of equal weight.

Candidates must answer one question from Section A and one question from Section B.

Section A: Poetry
(open book, clean copy)
Relevant assessment objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4

This section is based on the study of the WJEC Eduqas English Language and Literature Pre-1914 Poetry Anthology. The anthology covers a range of poetry from the late sixteenth century to 1914. It is designed to introduce students to the historical development of the English language, the rich heritage of writing poetry, as well as illustrating the variation in poetic content and style over time.

Candidates will answer one question from a choice of two. The question requires candidates to select poetry from the anthology, and make connections between their selected poetry and a previously unseen text. In preparation for the unseen text, students will need to read a range of texts published post-1914, including poetry, prose fiction, drama and non-literary texts.

Section B Prose (open book, clean copy)
Relevant assessment objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3

Section B is based on the study of one prose fiction text from the list below:
- Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
- Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
- Ian McEwan, Atonement
- Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day
- Alice Walker, The Color Purple 

Clean copies (no annotation) of the texts studied must be taken into the examination.

Candidates are required to answer one question. Each question will be presented in two separate but linked parts: part (i) is extract-based and focuses on close language study; part (ii) requires an extended response relating to the rest of the text.

Component 2 – Drama
External exam: 2 hours (120 marks)

This component is designed to introduce students to drama texts from different times. While students will engage critically with the texts as works of literature, this component offers opportunities for exploring the richness of the English language and its historical development set within the context of when the texts were produced and received. Students will need to develop their knowledge of dramatic techniques, their skills as interpreters of performance texts and their understanding of significant contextual factors throughout their studies for this component.

Section A: Shakespeare
(closed book)
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3

Section A requires candidates to respond to one compulsory extract-based task and one extended essay from a choice of two. In the first extract-based task, they will need to demonstrate their ability to read closely a key passage from the set text. The essay will require candidates to demonstrate knowledge of the wider play and to select appropriate supporting evidence in their response.


Section B: Post-1900 drama
(closed book)
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3

Section B is based on the study of one post-1900 drama text from the list below:
- Edward Albee, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
- Alan Bennett, The History Boys
- Diane Samuels, Kindertransport
- Tennessee Williams, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Component 3 – Non-Literary Texts
External exam: 2 hours (80 marks)

This component examines students’ abilities to explore connections across a wide range of texts. This component encourages extensive wider reading of spoken and written texts from different times and provides opportunities for students to select appropriate methods of analysis when exploring non-literary texts such as: spoken transcriptions, advertisements, autobiographies, biographies, travel writing, journalism, information texts, instructional texts, letters, reports, speeches, specialist publications.

In responding to non-literary texts, students should be able to recognise the bias, the moral outlook, the prejudices, attitudes and values of speakers and writers and to be able to analyse how these are conveyed through the use of language. Both sections of are equal weight.

Section A: Comparative Analysis of Spoken Non – Literary Texts
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3, A04.


Candidates are required to answer the compulsory question. The question requires candidates to produce a detailed comparative analysis of three unseen spoken language non-literary texts of different genres, chosen from a range of types and periods. The texts will be linked in terms of content, theme or style and the focus of the analysis will be provided in the question. At least one of the texts will be presented as a transcription. Candidates will be required to compare and contrast the three texts, using knowledge and skills gained from the integrated study of language and literature.



Section B: Non – Literary Text Study
(closed book)
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3

Section B is based on the study of one non-literary prose text from the list below:
- Andrea Ashworth, Once in a House on Fire
- Truman Capote, In Cold Blood
- Jenny Diski, Skating to Antartica
- David Eggers, A Heart Breaking Work of Staggering Genius
- George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

Candidates are required to answer one compulsory question on the set text they have prepared for this component. Each question will be presented in two parts: part (i) is extract-based and focuses on close language study; part (ii) requires an extended response relating to the rest of the text.


Component 4: Critical and Creative Genre Study
Non-exam assessment: 3200 – 3500 word folder (80 marks)

This component gives opportunities for students to independently select an aspect of prose study that interests them and to study one text chosen from a list provided by WJEC Eduqas within that genre. In addition, students are given the opportunity to select wider reading to inform their studies in this component and to reflect on the learning that has taken place. In reflecting on their studies, students will then be required to produce original writing related to their chosen genre.

Section A: Genre study
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4

Students are required to submit a 1500 word study based on the reading of a prose text (selected from the approved list – your teacher will give you a copy) and related wider reading from one of the following literary/non-literary prose genres:

Students must choose one genre and one text from the prescribed list. In addition students must select at least one other text within the same genre for wider reading. Texts for wider reading may be drawn from this list but are not restricted to this list. The texts provided in the list have been carefully selected to reflect the richness of literary and linguistic features within the named genre.

Section B: Relative Creative Writing
Relevant Assessment Objectives: AO5

Learners will produce two pieces of writing: one must be literary in style and the other non-literary. One of the pieces of writing must be in the same genre as that studied in section A. Both pieces of writing must be informed by the same research and study completed for section A. In producing each piece of writing, students will need to demonstrate their expertise as producers of language in relation to their accuracy and control of style for audience, purpose and form. In completing the two writing assignments, students will need to demonstrate that they can use language to communicate in different ways. For these tasks, ‘creativity’ will be demonstrated through the production of original and engaging writing.

Assessment:
 
Students will complete two PPE cycles and will have other suitable assessments within lessons every term or within the 10 week assessment cycle. 

Assessment in in A Level English Language and Literature aims to capture the progress students are making at four points throughout the academic year. This enables teachers to know which area of study to re-teach or review. Teachers can identify gaps in student learning and through effective feedback students can resolve misconceptions and swiftly develop further knowledge and skills.

GCSE Resits at KS5: 

Supporting students who still need to improve their Literacy and English skills in the sixth form:

For those students who return to KS5 without a grade 4 or above in English, we offer two pathways to support them / allow progression. We place students on the GCSE retake pathway or functional skills level 1 or 2 pathway; many of these students also attend.

Assessment: Students on the resit pathway are assessed regularly via PPEs, practice tasks and in class assessments. We offer a November GCSE resit opportunity for students who are ready for this and a summer exam in June. Functional skills 1 and 2 will be assessed on an ‘on demand’ basis.

Support and Intervention: 

Where appropriate, students are offered HLTA/ Learning Mentor support. Students are also supported by staff via Google Classrooms where they are given homework and additional materials to support their learning as needed.